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Liñiou Faté: The Forgotten Ones

Bibendum (the original name of the Michelin Man) has crossed borders to reach all points of the planet, such as sub-Saharan Africa, where it is used, as in so many other places, to indicate the presence of workshops for the repair and replacement of punctured tyres. This exhibition shows the creativity around the icon of Bibendum, through photographs, videos and original objects

  • From April 7th to July 2nd, 2017.
  • From Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00-20:00.
  • Free admission
  • Curators: Juanma Indo, José Luis Esarte
  • #STMbibendum
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Bibendum (the original name of the Michelin Man) is one of the best-known commercial icons in the history of design and marketing. A Western ensign that has crossed borders to reach all points of the planet, such as sub-Saharan Africa, where it is used, as in so many other places, to indicate the presence of workshops for the repair and replacement of punctured tyres.

Their owners are artisans, capable of repairing a truck tyre by sewing it with thread or with a steel plate and screws. They are also artists who paint their Bibendum to show, in the absence of offi cial signage, the activity they carry out. Bibendum sometimes appears with a primitivist halo; or in a free and artistic form, as street art language, at other times, as marketing. It is an attempt to emulate a brand, but there is always something more.

‘Liñiou faté’ means ‘the forgotten ones’ in Wolof, the language spoken in Senegal and Gambia. This exhibition shows the creativity around the icon of Bibendum, through photographs, videos and original objects found in Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Gambia and Benin.

It is a sample of the creativity around Bibendum gathered by Juan Mari Indo during his travels around the African continent. He found these paintings created by local artists in the most incredible places, such as deserts, roads, cities, villages, along stone or sand tracks, etc. In many cases they are anonymous works, reproducing this symbol on all kinds of materials: from  fl attened-out steel from fuel cans, wooden boards and piles of tyres to the walls of buildings and huts.

The exhibition also has a sociological and economic reading. It tells us about the South, about developing countries and the abandonment of these places by the West and its ensigns. It tells us about creativity in the midst of scarcity, but also about forgetfulness. They are forgotten images, condemned to disappear.

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Get the information about the offer (in spanish)


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